Epilepsy

Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions in the world, affecting around 6 million people in Europe. Epilepsy affects the brain, causing seizures. A seizure is caused by a sudden burst of intense electrical activity in the brain, temporarily disrupting its normal function. There are many different seizure types. In some seizures the person remains alert, but experiences altered sensations and perceptions. In others they lose consciousness, and their muscles may stiffen and jerk.

Epilepsy is usually diagnosed after someone has more than one seizure, and there is considered to be a high probability that they will have further seizures. Some types of epilepsy last for a limited time and the person eventually stops having seizures, but for most people, epilepsy is a life-long condition.

Epilepsy has no cure, but taking anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) helps people to prevent or reduce the frequency of seizures. AEDs don’t work for everyone, so other treatments may include brain surgery, vagus nerve stimulation or a special diet.

Source: Epilepsy Action and and Epilepsy Society